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Bump Test vs. Calibration vs. Servicing

Posted on September 3rd, 2019 by Brianna

Dealing with gas detection and customer enquiries daily, we get quite a few questions about the differences between bump testing, calibration, and servicing. We finally decided to set the record straight and share our knowledge with others.

Bump Test

The first type of test a bump test. This can be called many different things such as challenge testing, bump checking, field check, response check, and many more. The most common terminology is a “bump test”. A bump test is done to ensure the unit is in a working state. This includes a gas response, a state of alarm, and visual and audible alarms. We highly recommend bump testing your personal gas monitor (pgm) to ensure it is in working order and has not been damaged before your use thus ensuring your safety.

Check the AS/NZS standards for the most recent standards revolving around bump testing. If your company has set procedures for bump testing, we highly recommend following them. If they do not, then we highly recommend bump testing before each use.

We have video resources on how to bump test certain units that we stock. The most basic form of instruction is to apply gas to the unit to ensure the readings are changing and that the unit has gone into alarm. You can either do this manually with a bump test kit or automatically with a docking station (MicroDock II, IntelliDoX, or AutoRAE 2).

Contact us for a quote regarding either a bump test kit or a docking station through the form at the bottom of the page.

Calibration

The next type of test, which is more involved than a bump test, is a calibration. Calibrating is a type of test that calibrates the sensors of a gas monitor to a set known level of gas. This is done for safety precautions to ensure the unit is reading correctly. If a unit fails a bump test, then it will need to be either calibrated or serviced. This can be due to many different possibilities such as the sensors being overexposed to gas or the sensors that have been contaminated.

Check the AS/NZS standards for the technical requirements of calibrating. If your company has set procedures for calibration, we highly recommend following them. If they do not, then we highly recommend a calibration every 6 months or sooner as needed for your type of gas monitor.

To calibrate a gas detector a two-point check is made by a person deemed competent by the manufacturer. A unit can be calibrated manually or easily in an automated docking station. Using an automated docking station, such as an IntelliDoX, makes calibrating as easy as pushing a button.

If you have any questions or would like a quote for a docking station, fill out the contact form at the bottom of the page.

Service

The last type of “testing” you would call it per se, is a service. If a unit has either failed a bump test and/or calibration, it will need to be serviced to find out what exactly is wrong with it. Sometimes a service is done as a preventative measure to find problems that may arise in the future. This is why we always perform a servicing when units are sent in for calibration.

Check the AS/NZS standards for the technical requirements of servicing a unit. If your company has set procedures for servicing, we highly recommend following them. If they do not, then we highly recommend a service every 6 months or sooner as needed for your type of gas monitor.

When you send your unit into our office to get serviced, our team of experienced certified service technicians will perform a 13-point check. All units are stripped, inspected, and cleaned. Any parts such as sensors, screens, filters, and many other parts may need to be replaced during servicing thus extending the serviceable life of your units.

If you have any questions or would like a quote for a service/calibration, fill out the contact form at the bottom of the page.

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